from IODP 376 Blog

Sustainable Drilling

Latitude: 34.882º S Longitude: 179.068º E Days at sea: 12 The last few days were quite successful. We managed to drill more than 200 metres into the northwestern rim of the Brothers caldera and retrieved some wonderful cores. Fresh lava for us igneous petrologists and vocanologists, altered rocks for our alteration specialists and sulphides for […]

from IODP 376 Blog

At Site U1527 and drilling

May 10, 2018 Latitude: 34.867° S Longitude: 179.061° E Days at sea: 2 On Wednesday (May 9) morning, we left the port of Auckland and started our transit to Brothers Volcano. The seas were calm and the weather warm and sunny. Thus, the 24h transit was very smooth, there were no issues with seasickness and […]

from IODP 376 Blog

On board.

May 6, 2018 Latitude: 36° 50.60’S Longitude: 174°46.80’E Days at sea: 0 Hello and welcome to the IODP Expedition 376 “Brothers Arc Flux” Blog May 6, the start of our expedition. Our staff scientist, Tobias Hoefig, picked us and the other scientists up at the hotel in Auckland and brought us to the Freyberg Wharf […]

from msm71 Blog

Harvesting

Earthquake waves generated by the Sept 9, 2017 Mexiko earthquake (magnitude 8.2). The waves travel through the earth, similar to a medical computer tomography. We use these data to reconstruct the inner structure of our planet.

During our last days here in our working area we are shifting it into gear, because it is harvesting time! Finally we will have a look at our data coming back from the sea floor – we all have been waiting for this very moment since weeks now (and some of us since a few […]

from msm71 Blog

To fish in muddy waters…

OBS waiting for ist recovery on the starboard side of RV Maria S Merian. Photo: Y. Xia, GEOMAR

Doing science at sea has its very own rules – just like the German soccer cup or DFB-Pokal, for which the saying goes: The cup makes its own rules. The teams dedicate many months to a thorough preparation, all options are evaluated, everything is double-checked, every tactical variation is considered and at the end everything […]

from msm71 Blog

Ocean bottom What??

An OBS on the working deck of RV Merian. The orange cylinders are the floatations which make sure that the instrument will come back to the surface. Photo: Martha Deen

If you want to get an image of the Alps, you need seismometers surrounding the area. But how do you get the seismometers to work at the bottom of the sea? And how do you get them back? To explain this, we invite you to a virtual journey on board of the research vessel Maria […]

from msm71 Blog

EN ROUTE !

Stormy welcome on the Atlantic: View from the bridge of RV Maria S. Merian onto the virulent waves. Photo: A. Beniest, IPGP

With a few hours delay we left the port of Las Palmas on Gran Canaria to sail to the Ligurian Sea. The start of MSM 71 indeed proved stormy: The Atlantic waters greeted us with winds of 7 Bft and gales of up to 10 Bft with waves of 6 m height. Nonetheless, everybody on […]